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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
not agreed to anything yet. >> and ben bernanke will be releasing his ideas on how the fed is going to pull back from its current role of propping up the economy in every way, shape, and form. we're going to have that live at 10:00. i know his comments are coming out, mark. i'm not sure if he's actually going to physically be there because you know in washington it's a little snow. what are they going to do? >> i think they now have a total of 50, five zero, inches on the ground. >> yeah, yeah. >> we also have big snow issues in new york, baltimore, philadelphia, airports closed, schools closed. it's a real mess. this is a live picture. >> wow. >> well, it was a live picture of reagan national airport. it is empty. >> that's amazing. it really is. mark, you know i remember when there was a forecast of snow things would be shut down and called off and to your point pretty incredible what has been going on there. snowmageddon. that's an amazing picture, live. no one at the airport. >>> the futures right now are plus 0.70 on the s&ps. we needed 1.42 to get to fair value. so it's very close to
by a blueprint coming out from bernanke this week on a plan for credit tightening? >> now, you know, this is the usual thing, nicole, bernanke will come out and he'll have to be careful what he says. he has been saying we'll have an exit policy but not yet. exit policy means look at my finger. higher interest rates. it's like saying the market correctors. was it wrong before? the exit policy is when we're going to see higher interest rates in the united states and of course the markets right now don't want to hear about that. bernanke is saying when the time is appropriate will include interest rates because the markets will want to know when is the appropriate time. can you spell out what's going to happen? the problem is guess what? we're having low unemployment so what if we have low unemployment the month after that? will that be the appropriate signal? >> there we go. andrew freris to stay with us. we'll get you some headlines making news right now. meanwhile, around the world, in the united states, the head of the world's largest bond fund says 2010 will be a year of sovereign
much, sharon. we're not getting as much volatility today as yesterday although ben bernanke's tax did get a little movement. if you look at two-year yield it's slightly elevated and you look at the curve it's know changed. there's a potential for an exit strategy as depicted by that text. if you look at the next chart, indeed the euro versus the dollar has been mostly down, but it is bouncing back a bit especially in the last hour or so, keeping up with the headlines and some of those headlines, hey, the checks didn't have a good day and they sold an additional 150 million u.s. equivalent of their 15 year. they wanted to sell more, but portugal had better luck selling u.s. equipment of the 4 billion of ten-year note and let's hop across the pond and rebecca me ham. >> let's take a check of what's happening in europe and it's all about greece. no surprise there and we check on the fotse, the cac and the dax. 2.4% higher for greek eiquities today. we know we've had the european finance chiefsi having a conference call today. the ecb governing body is having a call tonight and tomorrow a
. bernanke said it. a lot of people said it. and then i said it after you said it. >> i know it. and you're on optimist. >> i am an optimist. >> in terms of why i thought it was contained was, first of all, i was talking about subprime and we made the mistake of just simply saying the subprime was not big in relation to a 13, $14 trillion u.s. economy. and what was really going on is we were talking about housing overall and since world war ii, housing, residential home prices, had generally gone up. and the mortgages were just considered to be very safe investments. and so the kind of decline we saw was something that was not envisioned in any kind of model. it wasn't anything that many people that were close it to -- after the fact, it seems obvious to all of us. but the -- and so when you had the kind of decline we saw in housing prices that changed the behavior of those of homeowners, and, also, the other thing you and i were talking about before the show is this -- all of this complexity. so when -- it. >> it's crazy. mortgage-backed securities that were rated triple-a by a bunch of
't you tell us what you think after hearing a couple days of bernanke's testimony on the hill. does it change your outlook on what the fed is doing? >> no, as long as they use the magic words, extended period, we know the fed will be on hold for at least six months. that's what bill dudley told us. he said extended period was the language the fed has put in the policy statement, means at least six months. it was a phrase repeated by st. louis fed president bullard recently. so whenever bernanke puts his word in on it as well, we can feel assured that the fed is not likely to move for at least six months. the fed needs to be very clear at this day and age. so if they're telling us that that's what extended period means, that's what it means. and so, until there's some other clarifying comments, that's what we have to go on. >> we had somebody who told us yesterday that maybe they could move 25, 50 basis points. it's not the extended period but they're focusing on the incredibly low rates. either one of you guys quily think that's the case? >> the focus is on the extraordinary program
. >> right. there's nothing they've got on ç you. >> not anymore. >> ben bernanke who oversaw the collapse of not just the united states but the entire world financial system and brought our economy to its knees has been reappointed as head of the fed. >> right. >> does this give you hope for being re-elected governor of new york? because may i remind you, he screwed everybody. >> i just became a fan of ben bernanke. >> i love colbert. spitzer is doing it right. he quit. gave up the governorship and showing the humility, well-earned humility this country is willing to accept. sarah who? watch senator scott brown dance away from sarah palin saying he never spoke to her. >> do you think that sarah palin is presidential material? >> well, sure. she has been a mayor and a governor and has a lot of national following. the more people in a presidential race the better. she never contacted us and vice versa. >> really? she has never contacted you? how do you figure this statement from palin's camp. governor palin spoke with a very happy senator-elect brown this evening and congratulated him. hmm.
of that market. >> diane, where does this leave fed chief ben bernanke in terms of interest rates and where we're heading? i mean, by most consensus here people would anticipate and he has said that he's going to leave them in a very low rate environment for quite some time. how long is that time going to be? >> you know, i've had the fed not raising rates until december for my entire forecast and i'm starting to re-think they might not raise it until 2011. this is a very weak economy. so the weather exacerbates weakness, no question about it. we may recoup some of those gains and we may recoup some of them in march, but at the end of day when you've got people losing income when they're living paycheck to paycheck already, that's just an economy that's not as resilient. it just underscores the fragility of the economy that ben bernanke himself said yes, the weather is noisy and we have to go through it and at the end of day this economy is not looking that great in the first quarter. >> speaking of that, let's attack today's data. milton, real gdp was revised upwards to 5.9% for the first qua
was sworn in for his second term as head of the federal reserve ben bernanke said he is worried about the pace of our economic recovery. he told his staff today the economy is growing but there's still too little bank credit, too many foreclosures and too many people unemployed. meantime treasury secretary tim geithner says congress can claw back what he is calling an outageus new amount of bonuses for aig employees. they are all set to pay out bonuses despite being bailed out by the federal government last year. tim geithner says the government can recoup the money by instituting the new bank fee that president obama called for in his 2011 budget. but aig says those bonuses were negotiated before the company asked for the bailout. what do you think about that? is it an outrageous failure of policy or do the aig employees deserve the bonuses, after all they were promised them. send your e-mails to me. >>> winning the seat of senator ted kennedy. an attorney wants brown to be sworn in tomorrow. once he is sworn in, brown will end the democrats majority in the u.s. senate. but president
economic appointees, brank bren bernan bernanke, who was the chairman of economic advisers under bush, and henry paulson, a very decent guy, came to us, the democratic and republican leadership and said, we need to do this bill. otherwise you go back a step. on the tuesday of that week, mr. bernanke and mr. paulson came to us and informed us, didn't ask us, that they had decided to provide money to aig. that was a bush administration unilateral decision. they then came back two days later and said, would you vote on $700 billion? we said, well, here's what we'll do. because you've announced that the world will collapse if we don't do it. and i think they were right that there was terrible trouble. but when the two top presidential appointees come to tell you, if you don't do this publicly, there'll be a collapse, then there'll be a collapse, because confidence is so important. so we were the ones who insisted on putting some pay controls on there. you're going to have ken feinberg on later. we also said, no, you can't do the $700 billion all at once, you've got to do it in sections. i
commercial real estate? i guess that you were all looking and listening to chairman bernanke when he talked about the next wave of defaults in the real estate area. >> yes. chair come well last questions, thank you very much -- develop last request questions. new loan fund than they did under the t.a.r.p. capital programs. one very important difference is that tarp was intended to provide capital for banks to assure their viability under conditions. this is powerful program designed to get banks to lend because as you know the dividend rate on this new capital can drop dramatically if and only if banks lend beyond where they are lending today. couple other points. the small banks we're talking about, have done a pretty good job of maintaining lending balances during this very difficult recession. we think many of them are eager to lend, and by providing them with more capital, in this case capital that could increase their tier 1 capital by 30 to 50% they should be more confident about able to support existing assets and increase their lending at the same time. >> it just brings me back mem
an international from the goldman sachs was number one you need 100 calls to federal chair ben bernanke but then the next highest number of calls and that burger you need 103 -- to emineth named dan jester -- thank you, mr. chairman. may i ask what firm that he worked for -- >> he worked for goldman sachs. >> i will have additional questions with regard to you phoned and we will place that in the record. >> can i just say one thing in response to this? it's very important, congress and you were suggesting the people involved in this were not acting in the public interest and you were suggesting they were working for the private interest now the public interest and that is not true and i believe none of those individuals would be part of a decision like that and i think these people were people of enormous integrity and experience operating under exceptional circumstances with no precedent doing the best they could for what was in the public interest -- >> i must move, i must move. the gentleman from florida secretary geithner, win did aig if you could give the date when did aig call and
. >> people orchestrated the bailout and ben bernanke and others says this makes them sick and it's what they hated the most. >> if you don't get the "fox business" network, you should demand it. so says neil cavuto. >> shepard: word of a rough standoff in the town of mccomb, illinois. it appears what's happened is a gunman is in a farm king store, which i'm told is a supermarket. and he's been shooting up the place. it's apparently, according to the reports from mccomb, illinois, north and west of the capital, two people may be dead. is that true? two people shot. my bad. we don't know their status. we know a couple people have been shot. people came out of the store crying and the s.w.a.t. team is there. the local reporter heard shots fired again. two farm king employees are hold up in an -- holed up in the office and eyewitness told the local tv the police, fire and ambulance crew are on the scene. the shooting is taking place now according to authorities. i just -- we have no idea who is doing the shooting and why these employees are holed up in the place. but we're getting crews fro
like the saints have it for a second. >> the guest host is inside the bernanke huddle during the financial crisis, former fed governor randy kroszner. >>> a big play here, a big play there, and the bulls may be ready to run. >> picked off. look out. just passed manning and tracy porter taking the ball all the way. touchdown, new orleans! >> "squawk box" begins right now. ♪ ♪ >>> good morning, everybody. welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with steve liesman, carl and joe are out but in studio we also have new york times reporter andrew ross sorkin. our guest host, randy kroszner, a business professor at the booth school of business. great to have you here, randy. >> great to see you. >> we have a lot to talk to you about this morning. let's go to your morning rundown. we have a game plan with howard ward, portfolio manager for gamco investors growth fund. then we'll see if we can diffuse the debt bomb that threatens the global market. it's a small problem we'll try to fix this morning. later we'll be monday morning quarterbacking the super bow
true. >> and#rone more question. how independent are you and how much is ben bernanke your boss? >> well, we're, we're,çó tçóhÑi reserve banks are set up to be independent but, the board of governors does have what they have general oversightçó responsibility for the 12 banks o#ty correctly. we're autonomousçó and the chairman of the federal reserve is the chairman of the board of governors, the federaokv?;búr's imÑ authority, and w7riÑiÑin that r. but i also have a board of directors from my çÑegion, ñran they're my boss asÑi well, or ty are my boss. and they can fire me. and or fail to reappoint my and so, i have a hot of oversight. and i think it is very important, though, that i have this board of directors because that brings that independent to the open market committee and that's essential and tha>e's w we were designed the way we were. >> you have the longest tenureÑ of all of the presidents of the federal reserve. you have been in that positñrio since 19ñfñ and been with theÑip of kÑ.nsas city since 1981 in various positions. and let's takeÑi ca
for banks in the country. host: ben bernanke referred yesterday to short-term political liability for this. guest: i think he is absolutely correct. people tend, under these kinds of conditions, to one to blame someone. the problem with that is there are plenty of people to blame. we deregulated the industry. the congress deregulated the industry. there was a culture, if you will, of deregulation. and this encouraged some of what i call speculative activities that led to the bubbles and then the collapse. yes, you had this reaction. i think it is an overreaction, and the outcome would be -- as you try to blame someone you get worse outcomes rather than better outcomes, and i think that is what the chairman was trying to communicate. host: does the banking committee and the members, are they right to be angry at the fete at all? guest: if they're going to be angry, i think they have to be angry at everyone, including themselves. they allow these organizations to get bigger and more risk oriented. and yes, and regulatory agencies because of this culture -- the regulatory agencies because of
and for the communities of america. host: ben bernanke cautioned senators not to curtail the fed's banking oversight, referring to short-term political liability for this. guest: i think he is absolutely correct. people tend, under these kinds of conditions, to want to blame someone. the problem with that is there are plenty of people to blame. we deregulated the industry. congress deregulated the industry. there was a culture, if you will, of deregulation, and this encouraged some speculative activities that led to the bubbles and then the collapse. yes, you have this reaction. i think it is an overreaction. i think the outcome would be -- as you try to blame someone, you get worse outcomes instead of better outcomes. i think that is what the chairman was communicating. it is certainly my message. host: senate banking committee -- are the right to be angry at the fed at all? guest: if they are going to be angry, they have to be angry at everyone, including themselves. they asked to eliminate glass-segall, which allowed these agencies to get better. the regulation backed off, if you will. in that ki
bernanke is concerned about the nation's economic recovery. during the ceremonial swearing in for his second term, bernanke told staffers that despite a growing economy, far too many people remain unemployed. he also talked about the challenges facing the fed, which include protecting its independence from congress and making the institution more open and accountable. >>> president obama's aunt is preparing to make her second bid for political asylum. she'll go before an immigration judge if boston after defying a deportation order in 2004. she's expected to argue that ties to the president could make her a political target if she returns to kenya. her status was revealed shortly before president obama was elected in 2008. >>> and while many of you are gearing up for this sunday's super bowl, some in the nfl are worried that the game's days could be numbered. the players association fears owners will impose a work stoppage after the current collective bargaining agreement expires and they're taking their caught to capitol hill. the league says a new collective bargaining agreement wil
. your dreams. more within reach. meet us at ameriprise.com. >>> ben bernanke. >> yes. >> who oversaw the collapse of not only the united states, but pretty much the entire world financial system. >> right. >> and brought our economy to its knees has been reappointed as head of the fed. >> right. >> does this give you hope for being re-elected governor of new york? because may i remind you, he screwed everybody. >> wow. >> eliot spitzer taking shots from colbert last night. here with us now, founder, editor of thedailybeast.com, tina brown. >> good morning, everyone. >> great to see you. we'll get to your explosive piece about andrew young. have you quite a bit to say about john edwards' body man. we may have to bleep that. but first, maureen dowd's don't ask, don't tell op-ed. she writes in part -- tinea it was a pretty remarkable day on capitol hill. >> i thought it was pretty believing. very moving indeed. one does ask whether it will ignite a cultural war thing and distract. that's the only thing that scares me, we do need to be focused on jobs now. the timing seems strange. but h
's an interesting idea. bernanke yesterday mentioned that the spike in jobless claims might have been at least partly related to the weather. i would say there's a little more uncertainty than maybe mr. knapp suggests as to whether or not this is weather related or how much of a comedown we're getting from that fourth quarter gdp which was very strong and as you said revised up, erin, to 5.9% from 5.7%. it is interesting to look at the details and where the strength was to kind of figure out whether or not, how much of that is going to continue. what you see when you look at it is the consumer was pretty weak at one point, 7%, and nobody thinks that's going to be any stronger in this quarter. business spending was very strong. that's a wild card. that could continue. exports strong again and of course the big part of that not shown here are the inventories -- inventory numbers. this conference, though, is going to be about the fed policy and the fed's role put on here by the university of chicago's school of business. there are going to be no less than four members of the federal market commit
as a country to have in place, hank, ben bernanke kumbaya tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people and finance and business and government. i cannot think of for that would have done a better job. but to look back of our country's financial system throes of during that period. some of you were in a party i was that in 2008 when the talk, when you have 3.5 four more trillion held by 30 million people on a sunday night are worried about whether they can get their money, that money was half of all deposits held in the banks at that time. you have a panic. you have commercial paper frees up entirely and some of the biggest companies described in the book worried if they would be payable in a short period of time. the sixth largest bank in the country with the maastricht staged domestic deposits and the third largest bank, wachovia, i needed a shotgun marriage on a monday morning and it just arrived this. interestingly the bookstores early september when fannie mae and freddie mac worry essentially bart -- broke. the two institutions guaranteed 40 percent of all res
the federal reserve to take the lead on this. citing mr. bernanke does not want to step up and -- i think mr. bernanke, unfortunately, does not want to step up and take responsibility. i think the administration put a good deal of capital to work to make sure that he stayed on as chairman of the fed. but honestly, it would require presidential leadership at this point. we see encouraging signs, but also discouraging signs. the president said nice things about big bankers and their compensation just last week. you have to ask the white house where we are on this issue. host: simon johnson is the author of an upcoming book, "13 bankers." when will this come out? guest: when wilthe end of march. i do not think this problem is going to go away anytime soon. host: wyoming, republican line. caller: i would just like to say a few things and please do not cut us off because we do not get a chance to get in as many times as the democrats and the independent line. i'm a conservative woman of color. i notice every time on c-span and i get to be disappointed. and i will get to my question. i notice a ta
in place. we had hank, ben bernanke tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people in finance and a lot of people in business and government. and i can't think of for that would have done a better job of getting us through that. now it's kind of fashionable to look back and pick at one aspect or another of what was happening and our country's financial system froze up during that period. some of you in this room were at a party i was at in september of 2008, one to talk was the money market funds saved. if we have 3.5 trillion fun missile by 30 million people who on is and they might are worrying about whether they can get their money that was half of all the process held by u.s. banks at the time you have a panic. you had commercial paper frees up entirely in the biggest companies of the united states and some are described in this book that worried whether they were going to meet their payroll and a short period of time to read the sixth largest bank in the country in terms of the domestic deposits, washington mutual failed over a weekend. you had the th
. with your support in mr. paulson, mr. bernanke we forced their stearns shareholders from a position that i think was a high of $170 a share in january. we force them down to $2 a share because the american taxpayer money was in the bailout. and that was something that was supported by the fed, by treasury because we felt that because the taxpayer was bailing them out, that the shareholders of bear stearns should not be held harmless. now, you have a different situation here, slightly different. a number of weeks later, where we have aig going under, and these are credit default swaps so the money going into aig is going right out to the counterparties. this is a pass through and the folks on the other side are goldman sachs. that is the principle beneficiary of all this. and we don't negotiate in nickel, not a sense of what they are getting. you are in the same position. you are supposed to be negotiating on behalf of the american people. you were saying the regulations were different. let me tell you something we were changing the rules and regulations every single day. we were taking act
release the minutes of their meetings. mr. bernanke does testify regularly on capitol hill, explaining what he is doing. and why he is affecting monetary policy the way he is. some have suggested such as milton friedman once, that we could replace the federal reserve with a computer that would determine money supply and interest rates by a basic formula. perhaps that would be better than the usual way we have done in the past. i think the federal reserve policy, you know, can be subject to certain criticism. i'm not sure how it would work to eliminate the federal reserve, but i think there is legitimate disagreement on the way that they've had with the recession. and i think that disagreement is there. las. . 650 employees at the spa at the cost of $100,000 for three days for each employee. was a cost comparison done to justify such a cost? how was that chosen at the venue? what happened there? >> in that particular case there was a cost comparison and there were quotes from several vendors. one the challenges is finding a venue for that many people. it is the high cost. it is the annu
with bernanke and for some reason there have been just no real uptick generally about the fact that those types of things already are prohibited. you can only use a minimal amount of the bank's capital in other areas of a bank holding company. in addition to that, it actually move capital permanently, you've got to reduce the capital of the commercial bank also. so i do wonder -- >> yes, go ahead. basically, you're saying that those who think this is simply a punitive move by the obama administration are right. am i reading you correctly? >> well, let me say this. look, paul volcker is like a folk hero here? there's no question. his inflation efforts were tremendously appreciated and the timing of the announcement, i think everybody on all sides are transparently political. that doesn't mean, that look, we don't need to continue to look at ways of dealing with this. i don't think it got a great reception yesterday. again, we've got one more hearing tomorrow with goldman and others and we'll drill down in another way, but my sense is there's not a lot of traction on it because there are mechanis
and secretary geithner concerning bans on proprietary trading by banks. according to chairman bernanke of the federal reserve, ben own proprietary trading for commercial banks may not be constructive. dr. summers, chief economic advisor in the current administration in the past has been a vocal proponent removing glass-steagall restraints. is there something in this obama administration and among the regulators concerning the volcker rule and restricting size and if so, what process -- what was expressed there? >> thank you, senator shelby. that's obviously a very important question. the proposals that the president articulated with respect to size and scope two weeks ago were ones that were based on a consensus recommendation of all of his economic team. so -- and i think you've heard secretary geithner and director summers speak to that quite directly. i think with respect to the regulators they are, of course, independent and i feel slightly less comfortable expressing their views. but i do think that in the main they are also supportive of this and we will work with them and obviou
that the time including president bush and secretary paulson and chairman bernanke, our judgment was those pressures esau actor lehman postal woodfin judgmatically amplified it's aig failed than they would spread to parts of the system that would otherwise been unaffected including basic confidence in the insurance system. >> let me get to the point. why is it the derivatives business, lending at the insurance companies, the commercial paper, the aircraft leasing business or something else? >> it is in some ways, again it is hard to separate. what is systemic risk, a difficult thing to judge. >> we are all finding that out of here. >> but that is the reality of it. but again i think the simplest way to they this is look at what happened after lehman brothers and the broader collapse of many of our large institutions. the value of the american savings fell by 40%. you saw hundreds of thousands of businesses forced to close, millions of people lost work. basic confidence in the stability of our system was broken. the rivets for coming of the submarine and in that environment to have the larg
responsible for those decisions at that time, including president bush, secretaryw3 paulson, chairman bernanke along with me. our judgment was those problems would have been dramatically amplified if aig had failed and they would spread to parts of the system that would have otherwise been unaffected, including basic confidence in the insurance industry. >> or is it to the derivative business? securities lending and insurance companies? the commercial paper? the aircraft leasing business? or something else? >> it is hard to separate. what is systemic risk is a difficult thing to judge. >> we are all finding that out. >> that is the reality of it. i think the simplest way to say it is look at what happened >> but that's the reality of it. again, i think the simplest way to say it is look at what happened after lehman brothers and the broader collapse of many of our larger institutions look what happened in that. savings vel fell by 40%. you saw hundreds of thousands of businesses forced to closed, millions of people lost their work. basic confidence in the stability of our system was broken. yo
paulson, chairman bernanke along with me. our judgment was those problems would have been dramatically amplified if aig had failed and they would spread to parts of the system that would have otherwise been unaffected, including basic confidence in the insurance industry. >> or is it to the derivative business? securities lending and insurance companies? the commercial paper? the aircraft leasing business? or something else? >> it is hard to separate. what is systemic risk is a difficult thing to judge. >> we are all finding that out. >> that is the reality of it. i think the simplest way to say it is look at what happened after lehman brothers and the broader collapse of many of the large institutions. the value of american savings fell 40%. hundreds of thousands of businesses forced to close. mary and the people lost their work. basic confidence in the system was broken. derivativto have vote largest ie company in the world that had written savings contracts hundreds of thousands of american households, and under a state and local governments, to have that institution fail in that en
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)